Monthly Archives: November 2016

Keeping Your Pet Safe at Thanksgiving

shutterstock_4156369Here are the 5 Thanksgiving foods that your dog should avoid:

While it’s wonderful to include your pets in your holiday traditions, it’s important to remember that our canine companions cannot indulge in the same feasts that we prepare for ourselves. Some of the common Thanksgiving foods that fill our plate can actually be very dangerous for your pooch to ingest.

        1. Turkey bones are small and can become lodged in your dog’s throat, stomach, or intestinal tract. They may also splinter and cause severe damage to the stomach or puncture the small intestine.

            1. Fat trimmings and fatty foods like turkey skin and gravy are difficult for dogs to digest. In fact, consuming turkey skin can result in pancreatitis. Symptoms for this serious disease can include vomiting, extreme depression, reluctance to move, and abdominal pain.

                1. Dough and cake batter contain raw eggs, so the first concern for people and pets is salmonella bacteria. What’s more, dough may actually rise in your dog’s belly, which can lead to vomiting, severe abdominal pain, and bloating.

                    1. Mushrooms can damage your dog’s internal organs, including kidneys, liver, and central nervous system. Symptoms can include seizures, coma, vomiting, and possibly death.

                        1. Raisins and grapes, although the causes of their toxicity are unknown, can cause kidney failure in dogs.

                      The best way for your pet to partake in the holiday cheer? Stick with traditional treats that are safe for dogs! Food puzzles and interactive toys like a Kong filled with peanut butter are a great way to keep your canine entertained and feeling satisfied all holiday long.

                      Love is Ageless

                      November is National Adopt-a-Senior-Pet Month, and local animal shelters are full of animals of all shapes, sizes, breeds, and ages. Senior pets are frequently the most difficult lreesto place. Though they are typically more than seven years of age, there are many benefits to adopting a senior pet.

                      Most senior animals are surrendered by owners who could no longer keep them due to health or financial reasons. Though they may not know every trick, they are usually already housebroken and leash-trained.

                      The transition into your home will likely be easier and less destructive. While younger pets need constant supervision and training, most senior pets are already housebroken. They may even understand several commands already.

                      While an older pet can still have a lot of energy, they tend to have more stable personalities and require less excessive attention than younger animals. This makes them an ideal choice for the elderly and young children.

                      Senior pets seem to know that you saved them and are grateful for the second chance at life that you have given them. There is no better gift than adopting a senior pet and giving them the best last years of their life. Unfortunately, they are most often passed up for puppies or kittens and spend far too long looking for a home to live out the rest of their golden years.

                      This November, please consider adopting one of our wonderful senior pets at Berk’s ARL or Hillside S.P.C.A. There are many sweet animals waiting to be your next best friend! To find a senior pet see all the adoptable animals at these local shelters’ websites at: Berk’s Animal Rescue League (ARL) https://www.berksarl.org/ or Hillside S.P.C.A. https://www.hillsidespca.com/