Category Archives: Community

Dog Park Etiquette

What Is Proper Dog Park Etiquette?

The idea behind dog parks is wonderful; they’re safely fenced-in places for your dog to run and play with other dogs. But sometimes the experience is not what you expected, usually because someone hasn’t used good judgment. So, let’s think about what good dog park etiquette would be.

  1. shutterstock_235637188Only take your dog to the park if she loves it. If she is worried, anxious, easily upset, or aggressive, the dog park will make her worse.
  2. When you arrive, look around at the other dogs & people BEFORE you let your dog off leash. If someone has brought their large dog into the “small dogs only” section, your little dog might not be safe, for example. Look at the body language of the other dogs, before you let your dog off-leash.
  3. Watch your dog while he’s loose; don’t get caught up talking to people you meet & ignore what your own dog is doing. If he looks afraid, or doesn’t seem to be enjoying himself, go get him & leave.
  4. Also, if your dog is bullying another dog, go get him. All of the dogs in the park should be enjoying themselves; if your dog is going after another dog who is cowering or rolling over & showing his belly, it’s up to you to get your guy leashed back up.

For most people, it’s hard to read a dog’s body language. Even if you’ve had dogs all your life, most dogs accommodate us fairly successfully, so you may never have been forced to learn to read a dog. Luckily, there are excellent online resources; check these out! You’ll love them!

  • Zoom Room’s videos:
    • Dog Body Language
    • Dog Play Gestures Body Language
  • Association of Pet Dog Trainer (APDT) videos; this is a wonderful website
  • Whole Dog Journal Dog Body Language Dictionary of Stress
  • www.dogdecoder.com (they have a $3.99 app that’s excellent!)
  • Eileenanddogs Dog Body Language Collection

Love is Ageless

November is National Adopt-a-Senior-Pet Month, and local animal shelters are full of animals of all shapes, sizes, breeds, and ages. Senior pets are frequently the most difficult lreesto place. Though they are typically more than seven years of age, there are many benefits to adopting a senior pet.

Most senior animals are surrendered by owners who could no longer keep them due to health or financial reasons. Though they may not know every trick, they are usually already housebroken and leash-trained.

The transition into your home will likely be easier and less destructive. While younger pets need constant supervision and training, most senior pets are already housebroken. They may even understand several commands already.

While an older pet can still have a lot of energy, they tend to have more stable personalities and require less excessive attention than younger animals. This makes them an ideal choice for the elderly and young children.

Senior pets seem to know that you saved them and are grateful for the second chance at life that you have given them. There is no better gift than adopting a senior pet and giving them the best last years of their life. Unfortunately, they are most often passed up for puppies or kittens and spend far too long looking for a home to live out the rest of their golden years.

This November, please consider adopting one of our wonderful senior pets at Berk’s ARL or Hillside S.P.C.A. There are many sweet animals waiting to be your next best friend! To find a senior pet see all the adoptable animals at these local shelters’ websites at: Berk’s Animal Rescue League (ARL) https://www.berksarl.org/ or Hillside S.P.C.A. https://www.hillsidespca.com/